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New Zealand DOC uses ZIMS to manage in situ and ex situ populations

The Kakī wading bird is one of the rarest species of birds in the world. The New Zealand DOC has successfully bolstered populations in the wild to 106 Kakī, up from a low of 23 in 1981, and will now record their care and management in ZIMS.

We are happy to welcome the New Zealand Department of Conservation (DOC) Kakī Conservation Program to the Species360 member community.  This government-led species recovery program manages or monitors about 200 Kakī (wading birds), both in situ and ex situ. 

In April, the New Zealand DOC’s Takahē (flightless bird) Recovery Program joined Species360 and uses the Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS) to record management of populations of Takahē birds across its network of more than 20 in situ and ex situ locations on various New Zealand islands. Learn more about the amazing work being done by the New Zealand DOC’s Takahē (flightless bird) Recovery Program.

The Kakī wading bird is one of the rarest species of birds in the world. The New Zealand DOC has successfully bolstered populations in the wild to 106 Kakī, up from a low of 23 in 1981.  Species360 is honored to support these conservation efforts by holding critical data in ZIMS.

Species360 New Members in 2021

In all, 36 aquariums, zoos, and educational institutions have joined Species360 in 2021, including institutions in Australia, New Zealand, India, Israel, Indonesia, Romania, Russia, France, Germany, Czech Republic, Spain, United Kingdom, United States, and Canada. Taiwan Association of Zoos and Aquariums (TAZA) is a new Association Member, and is in the process of migrating their studbooks to ZIMS. 

Also in 2021: Species360 Research Partner Program has added (5) new institutions, including the IUCN Species Survival Commission – Primates Section on Small Apes; University of Suffolk (UK) Wildlife, Ecology and Conservation Science Program; Ark Animal Health/Sorrento Therapeutics; North Carolina State University; and University of Virginia (Unites States). The later will use physiological markers data in ZIMS as part of a comparative study of parasitism and immune function in primates.

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